South likes: Ruta Mistica at Museo Amparo, Puebla

 

Antonio Paucar

Antonio Paucar, Altar, 2005, photography

South likes: Ruta Mistica at Museo Amparo, Puebla
Ruta Mistica
Museo Amparo, Puebla, Mexico
8 March – 28 April, 2014

A reassessment of the notion of mysticism in the current postcolonial Latin-American cultural context is the subject of the exhibition Ruta Mística (Mystical Path), organized by the Monterrey Museum of Contemporary Art (MARCO) and presented at Amparo Museum in Puebla. In a moment of ideological uncertainty and global instability, rather than an illustration of an idea, as the curator Gonzalo Ortega claims, the show is presented as a sort of diagnosis on the production of ten artists, who share the same interest of the revaluation of a concept. In the attempt to understand and define a concept so ancient as much as controversial, the exhibition space is articulated in two sections, each defined by the works’ materials—one oriented towards pictorial representation and one with projects with social engaging. The different approaches oscillate between humour and dignity, meticulous research and free execution, tradition and present-day mythologies. The result outlines the various deviations of Latin-American history and those inherited from Europe through a more postcolonial cliché,
The transmission of the myth and its reconfiguration via sculpture, drawing and a tile installation is proposed by the artist Marcos Castro, whose work Solve et coagula (2012). The mention of the ancient aztecan myth of the eagle devouring a snake, also the national symbol of Mexico, relates the past with the recent history of the country, where the snake has become stronger without being a victim anymore. The theme of death is approached through the notions of memory and time in the work of Gabriel de la Mora and María García-Ibáñez. The first recreates a timeless family portrait in his work Memoria I, 21.10.07 (2007), consisting of skulls’ masks made of calcium sulphate. The latter, in her series Hue- sos/Piedras/Flores (2011), creates a sort of a burial, placing on a table decorated ceramic bones, stones and flowers, like elements which lead to purification and accompany our journey to eternity. An ephemeral, ritual and contemplative act is proposed by the artist Antonio Paucar’s Altar, according to the title of his video, in which the artist’s hand transforms from an animal’s paw to a hand-made candelabra.
The need of a personal cosmovision and the integration of mystical practices into the creative process was often part of the art history and a priority for many artists. This time it comes as a antidote to the western rationalism, through a specimen of the Mexican contemporary art scene in this carefully curated show which indicate a unique Mystical Path.

Klea Charitou

http://www.museoamparo.com/en/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/mystic-rute/

Gabriel de la Mora, Memoria I, 21.10.07, 2007, calcium sulphate with application of cyanoacrylate, resin base and stainless steel supports, 17 skulls, audio loop 4'34". Courtesy of the artist and OMR Gallery, Mexico City

Gabriel de la Mora, Memoria I, 21.10.07, 2007, calcium sulphate with application of cyanoacrylate, resin base and stainless steel supports, 17 skulls, audio loop 4’34”. Courtesy of the artist and OMR Gallery, Mexico City

Marcos Castro

Marcos Castro, Disuelve y Coagula, 2012, talavera. Uriarte-UDLAP Collection

Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla

Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla
Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla

Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla

Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla

Ruta Mistica, installation shot, 2014, Museo Amparo, Puebla

 

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